eLearning

For today’s module, we will be looking at the basics of web design. More specifically, web design online. I will be using information from Kerrie Hughes’ article: “Web design training: the top 22 online resources.” These are of course my own personal three choices out of the 22 listed that I find to be the most useful given their target audience: students.

Lynda.com

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Now, I might be biased when it comes to Lynda and it’s capabilities. I am currently using the program to learn the Adobe Creative Suite in a directed study with Dr. Rockwell.

“…Lynda.com offers a wide range of video-based tutorials that can teach you how to design websites (as well as covering other design-related subjects) for a monthly fee. Lynda.com has been around since the dawn of the web (it launched in 1995), and also produces books, videos, and documentaries.”

I’ve been using the program for the last three months and I have to say it has been a real pleasure to use. You get to make your own playlists or the instructor sends you one, you progress by watching the examples and following its example, and when you finish one playlist there are thousands of others to choose from! Not to mention it’s massive library can also teach you anything from animation, public speaking, social media management, etc.

As a generation filled with visual and auditory learners, this is definitely the way to learn. Plus, you can learn at whatever pace you desire.

Smashing Magazine

smashing_magazine

Now we are into more of the unknown territory. I’ve never personally used Smashing Magazine but from what Hughes describes it as it is just up my alley. Hughes states that “the web design blog Smashing Magazine is a fantastic resource for tutorials on all aspects of the process. The lessons are aimed at the intermediate to advanced end of the web design spectrum.”

Given that most of us are intermediate coders and website engineers, I don’t see any flaws in giving this program a shot.

Codecademy

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Apparently, they brand themselves as the “easiest way to learn how to code.” And nothing I have seen on their site would prove any differently. The site can also train you on how to do social networking which is always a bonus.

Conclusion

Obviously, I have my bias. Lynda.com is just top notch compared to everyone else. I 100% believe that if we were to go another route with CA 260, Lynda would be the way to go. I think that interaction in the classroom is important, yes. But would there be any harm in switching the class to completely online? I don’t truly think so. I think I would get just about the same out of the class be it completely online or not.

 

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